The Blind Deboss | Paper Story

When asked if we offer embossing, we hesitate to say no right away. Often when asking for embossing, people actually mean a blind hit. Embossing is a process that requires a die and a counter die, while a blind deboss is letterpress printing without ink which allows us to use our standard printing plates. While we do not offer embossing in-house, we are happy to out-source this process when combined with letterpress printing.

Kropuenske/Anderson Wedding Invitation

Green and grey modern leaves letterpress wedding invitation

Green and grey modern leaves letterpress wedding invitation detail

Becky Chan of Honey and Bloom designed this beautifully modern invitation suite. The solid green leaves were achieved by double-inking the green plate. This bright green and warm grey color combination has become a favorite around the shop.

Notes: Printed in 2 colors on 220# Crane Lettra Pearl White paper with matching printed Lettra envelope

Joey Roth Poster

 

 

joeyrothposter_full joeyrothposter_detail1This poster idea was created by San Francisco industrial designer Joey Roth. The original which was featured in the hustler-themed 48 Hour Magazine was not letterpress printed, but Joey wanted to have a special edition printed with us following the encouraging response for the poster in the magazine’s release. You can purchase the poster on Joey’s website here.

 

Notes: Printed in black on 32# Crane Lettra Pearl White on the Nebiolo cylinder press

Esch/Hunt Save the Date

Every once in a while we are requested to print on non-traditional material. When asked to print on wood veneer, we were skeptical, but anxious to see the results. Wood veneer does not allow for a deep impression, but the uneven surface does create a neat weathered look, showing off the patterns in the woodgrain.

Notes: Printed in 1 color on wood veneer in Maple from cardsofwood.com

Perpetual Calendar

 

Our first self-promotional piece has gone out, and many thanks to all who have written with kind comments about it. ┬áIt was a lot of work, but we’re all very proud of the final result. The idea came from a small, pocket-sized metal perpetual calendar given away by Kaufman-Seeds in Ashtown, Arkansas in 1973.

Notes: Printed in 5 colors on the front and 5 colors on the back on 18 pt Mohawk Renewal board. The moving wheel mechanism between the front and back boards is printed in 3 colors.

If you would like one, you can visit our Etsy store at dependableletterpres.etsy.com